5 Free Ways To Boost Your Child’s Creativity

Brain

It isn’t just artists, musicians and performers who need creativity. Any time that you need to solve a problem, creativity is the skill that will help you to find a solution. Creativity is about being able to think in an original way and solve problems intelligently. Creativity is what you need to come up with great ideas for doing something new or doing something in a better way.

So what can a parent do to boost this vital skill in their children? You do not need to splash out on expensive art sets, exhibition visits or concert tickets to nurture your child’s creativity.  Here are 5 ideas for fun things that you can do for free with your children.

  1. When we think of creativity our first thought is often art and craft. This certainly is a brilliant way to develop creative thinking and it does not need to cost lots of money.  Take a look through the materials that you are putting in the recycling or throwing out.  Could your child use those empty boxes, cartons, newspapers and tubes to make something?
  2. Reading is one of the best ways to develop creativity. Every book is world of new and exciting ideas just waiting to be explored. Whether you read to your child or they are old enough to read for themselves, get down to your local library and get borrowing books!
  3. Get out of the house and get some fresh air. Walk in a wood, a park or just take a different route to school or to the shops and go see something new. 
  4. Listen to different types of music. You can listen to music for free all day long – just switch on the radio.  Allowing your child to listen to a wide variety of musical styles will give them an appreciation of different rhythms, how different instruments sound and of the sheer quantity of different types of music.
  5. Play the what if? game. What if the cat turned into a dog? What if we painted the house purple? What if we ate dinner at breakfast time and had cereal for breakfast? What if you dressed as a clown tomorrow? Thinking about unusual scenarios helps your child to think about things in a different way, which is the essence of creative problem solving.

About the Author: Jacqui O'Brien is the Editor of eParenting.








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